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Arthroscopic meniscal débridement

Arthroscopic meniscal débridement

May not help patients with degenerative meniscal tears.Arthroscopic meniscal débridement is a commonly performed procedure in patients with degenerative meniscal tears. A recent study reports that arthroscopic surgery did not result in a significant improvement in pain scores in the short term or in the long term. An article written by Moin Khan, MD and others published August 25, 2014 in the CMAJ reviewed 805 patient outcomes for function and pain relief. The study compared surgery with: exercise or physical therapy; NSAIDS plus exercise; steroid injections; or control groups without meniscal débridement (sham treatment).

The authors conclude that the evidence suggests there is no benefit to arthroscopic meniscal débridement for degenerative meniscal tears in comparison to nonoperative treatments or sham treatments in middle-aged patients with mild or no accompanying osteoarthritis.

Informed patients along with their physicians need to carefully weigh the anticipated benefits against the possible harms when considering treatment options.

http://www.cmaj.ca/content/early/2014/08/25/cmaj.140433.full.pdf​

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Recovery is an important, and often overlooked part of an exercise routine

Recovery is an important, and often overlooked part of an exercise routine

It is required to allow your body to be healthy to make physical gains. Stretching is required to maintain flexibility of muscles and should be done before and after an exercise routine. Maintaining proper hydration and nutrition is important to refuel the body after exercise.

Cross training is alternating the type of exercise or body parts that you are strengthening. This allows for parts of your body to rest and recover while you exercise others. Lastly, sleep is mandatory to help your body maintain its best function. It is not beneficial to get up early to exercise if you have had less than 7-8 hours of sleep.

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Exercise helps manage the pain associated with arthritis

Exercise helps manage the pain associated with arthritis

arthritisSome people think that people with arthritis shouldn’t exercise, or even that forceful exercise such as running can cause arthritis.  This is a myth.  Exercise is one way to help manage the pain associated with arthritis.  It just requires performing a routine that is beneficial rather than irritating to your joints.

The goal is to do a program that allows for strength and endurance in a way that is less than body weight. This is best done sitting or laying, and aquatic exercises are always beneficial for this population.

ergonomics

Ergonomics is the study of people’s efficiency in their work environment.  Sitting at a computer is the most common problem in a work or home setting.  Ideally, the top of the computer screen should be at eye level and down. It needs to be close enough that you don’t lean forward to see it well.

The arms should be down at your side and supported there by arm rests.  Your feet should be able to rest flat on the floor.  The chair should have proper lumbar cushion and support so that you maintain an upright posture.

 

back

The most common area of pain is in the low back, or lumbar spine.  The general diagnosis of degenerative spine problems are a common reason for back pain.

This is often seen in the older adult population, and sometimes includes leg pain. This set of conditions required a flexion based exercise program, which helps to open up the spine and decrease the amount of pressure in the area.

Extension exercises should be avoided and walking for exercise should be limited, as it is a common aggravating factor.  See a Physical Therapist for a specific plan that can help reduce these symptoms and return you to functional activities.

 

r7_fasciitis-1Plantar fasciitis is inflammation of connective tissue in the arch of the foot, and causes pain with standing. Pain is often worst in the heel first thing in the morning, as the tissue is tightest then.

It is imperative for people with this diagnosis to wear proper shoes that provide good arch support.  The plantar fascia needs to be stretched and the foot and ankle strengthened so that it has proper mechanics.

 

greater troch

 

Pain on the side of the hip is often caused by greater trochanteric bursitis.  This is an inflammatory condition of the bursa(a fluid filled sack) that is on the outside of the hip.  It causes pain with side sleeping and repetitive motions like walking or stair climbing.

The muscles in this area are commonly weak, and need to be strengthened to  stabilize the pelvis.

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Vitamin D – the best way to obtain it

Vitamin D – the best way to obtain it
Vitamin D is necessary for our bodies. It can help decrease your chance of getting up to 16 different types of cancer. It also helps build bones, quell inflammation, and boost the immune system. The best way to obtain Vitamin D is through… short exposure to the sun. Soaking in the sun 10-20 minutes a couple times a week can help boost those Vitamin D levels can help optimize your health.  Make sure you don’t over do it though!
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/you-need-sun-10-healthy-tips-to-get-it.html?page=4
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Am I too young to be screened for Osteoporosis?

Am I too young to be screened for Osteoporosis?

OSTEOPOROSIS SCREENING

J Bone Mineral Res 2014.

There is no consensus when it comes to screening younger women for osteoporosis.

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) endorses the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX; based on clinical risk factors) to identify screening candidates who should undergo bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Two other commonly used methods for predicting osteoporosis risk are the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST; based on weight and age) and the Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation Tool (SCORE; based on race, rheumatoid arthritis, history of nontraumatic fracture, age, prior estrogen therapy, and weight).

None of the three common osteoporosis screening strategies is optimal for younger postmenopausal Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) women, and the US strategy is the worst, according to research using data from the Women’s Health Initiative.

One in two older women will have fracture in their remaining lifetimes,” Dr. Crandall said. “Physicians should make sure to keep up on how to screen for and treat osteoporosis before serious fractures occur.” (It is not really up to physicians as much as insurance company restrictions when it comes to screening. I have seen many women in their 30’s with osteoporosis.

“Bone protection strategies such as optimal calcium and vitamin D intake, regular weight-bearing activity, and avoidance of excessive alcohol intake are important strategies for everyone to adopt,” Dr. Crandall added.

Learn more about the benefits of bioDENSITY to improve bone density by calling the KAIZEN TOTAL WELLNESS CENTER at (941) 315-6182

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