All Posts tagged bone density

Am I too young to be screened for Osteoporosis?

Am I too young to be screened for Osteoporosis?

OSTEOPOROSIS SCREENING

J Bone Mineral Res 2014.

There is no consensus when it comes to screening younger women for osteoporosis.

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) endorses the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX; based on clinical risk factors) to identify screening candidates who should undergo bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Two other commonly used methods for predicting osteoporosis risk are the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST; based on weight and age) and the Simple Calculated Osteoporosis Risk Estimation Tool (SCORE; based on race, rheumatoid arthritis, history of nontraumatic fracture, age, prior estrogen therapy, and weight).

None of the three common osteoporosis screening strategies is optimal for younger postmenopausal Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) women, and the US strategy is the worst, according to research using data from the Women’s Health Initiative.

One in two older women will have fracture in their remaining lifetimes,” Dr. Crandall said. “Physicians should make sure to keep up on how to screen for and treat osteoporosis before serious fractures occur.” (It is not really up to physicians as much as insurance company restrictions when it comes to screening. I have seen many women in their 30’s with osteoporosis.

“Bone protection strategies such as optimal calcium and vitamin D intake, regular weight-bearing activity, and avoidance of excessive alcohol intake are important strategies for everyone to adopt,” Dr. Crandall added.

Learn more about the benefits of bioDENSITY to improve bone density by calling the KAIZEN TOTAL WELLNESS CENTER at (941) 315-6182

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Bone density and exercise

Bone density and exercise

Millions of individuals have low bone mass.  Aging or menopause leads to a decrease in bone formation, which results in decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of fracture.  A recent review in the Journal of the American Physical Therapy Association (August 2013) was conducted to determine which, if any, approaches to exercise reduce BMD loss or reduce the chance of fractures.  The results show that a combination exercise program that incorporates several exercise types can result in a statistically significant change in BMD.  An example of a combination exercise program would include the following: walking, dynamic weight bearing, low-load high-rep strength training, and progressive resistance strength training.  The report concluded that gradually adding weight training and dynamic exercise 2 to 3 times a week to a 30 minute per day walking program for at least 6 months may reduce the risk of fracture and have a beneficial effect on BMD.  A physical therapist can help plan and design an appropriate program.

David Maloney, Physical Therapy Assistant
Kaizen Total Wellness

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