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What is a carb?

What is a carb?

carbohydrate

What is a Carb?

Know what Foods Contain Carbohydrates

  • Starches
    • Bread, cereal
    • Pasta, rice, grains
    • Beans and lentils
    • Starchy vegetables: potatoes, corn and peas
    • Crackers, pretzels and chips
    • Fruits and fruit juices
    • Milk and yogurt
    • Sugary desserts
    • Non-starchy vegetables: broccoli, carrots, asparagus and salad greens

 

How to Measure Carbohydrates

1 carb choice = 15 grams of carbohydrate

  • 1/3 cup cooked rice or 1 slice of bread
  • 1 small piece of fruit or ½ cup fruit juice
  • 1 cup (8 oz) milk or 2/3 cup (6oz) low-fat yogurt

Creating your Meal Plan

The amount of carbohydrates you eat should depend on your nutrition goals.  This booklet is a general guideline; consult with your dietician for the plan that is specific for you and your goals.  The registered Dietician (RD) is the health care professional trained to teach you how to improve your health and health choices.

 

  For Weight Loss For Weight Maintenance Snacks (If Desired)
Women 2 to 3 carb choices 3 to 4 carb choices 1 carb choice
Men 3 to 4 carb choices 4 to 5 carb choices 1 carb choice

 

Carbohydrate Choice Lists

Starch Choices

1 Carbohydrate choice = 15 grams carbohydrate

Bread:

Food Serving   Size
Bagel 1/4 large (4 oz)
Biscuit, 2.5 inches across 1
Bread, reduced calorie 2 slices
Bread, white or whole grain 1 slice
Cornbread, 1.75 inch cube 1
English muffin ½
Hot dog or hamburger bun ½
Naan (8 x2) ¼
Waffle or pancake (4 x.25) 1
Tortilla, corn or flour (6 in) 1

 

Cereals and Grains:

Food Serving   Size
Barley, couscous, millet, pasta, rice,   quinoa, or polenta cooked 1/3 cup
Bran cereal, shredded wheat, or   sugar-coated cereal ½ cup
Bulgar. Grits. Palin oatmeal. Or wild   rice. Cooked ½ cup
Cereal, unsweetened, ready to eat ¾ cup

 

Starchy Vegetables:

Food Serving   Size
Acorn or butternut squash or pumpkin,   unsweetened 1 cup
Cassava or plantain 1/3 cup
Corn, green peas, or parsnips ½ cup
Potato, baked with skin 1 small or ¼ large
Potato, mashed with milk and fat ½ cup
Sweet potato or yam ½ cup

Crackers and snacks:

Food Serving   Size
Chips, baked 15-20 pieces
Chips, potato or tortilla 9-13 pieces
Crackers, animal 8
Crackers, graham 3
Crackers, saltine or round butter-type 6
Popcorn 3 cups, popped
Pretzels ¾ oz
Rice cakes 2

Beans and Lentils:

Food Serving   Size
Baked beans 1/3 cup
Beans (black, pinto, navy, or kidney)   lentils, or split peas, cooked ½ cup

 

Fruit:

Food Serving   Size
Banana 1 extra-small
Blueberries or blackberries ¾ cup
Fruit, dried or raisins 2 Tbsp
Fruit, fresh or canned unsweetened ½ cup
Fruit, whole 1 small
Fruit juice, unsweetened ½ cup
Grapes small 17
Melon or raspberries 1 cup

Milk Choices

1 carbohydrate choice = 12 grams carbohydrate

Food Serving   Size
Buttermilk 1 cup
Milk(nonfat, 1%, 2%, whole) 1 cup
Rice drink, fat-free 1 cup
Soy milk, light or regular, plain 1 cup
Yogurt, plain or flavored with an   artificial sweetener, fat-free or low-fat 2/3 cup

Sweets and Dessert Choices

1 carbohydrate= 15 grams carbohydrate

Food Serving   Size
Brownie 1 1/4 –inch square
Cake, unfrosted 2-inch square
Candy, hard 3 pieces
Cookie, sandwich 2 small
Ice cream, regular ½ cup
Pudding, sugar free 1.2 cup

2 carbohydrate choices= 30 grams carbohydrate

2 carbohydrate choices= 30 grams carbohydrate

Candy bar, chocolate, plain 1 ¼ oz
Cupcake, frosted 1 small
Donut, glazed 1

3 carbohydrates= 45 grams carbohydrates

Food Serving   Size
Flan 1 cup
Fruit pie with 2 crusts 1/6 of 8 in pie
Rice pudding ½ cup

Non starchy Vegetables

1 serving = 5 grams carbohydrates

Food Serving   Size
Vegetables, cooked ½ cup
Vegetables, raw 1 cup
Vegetable juice ½ cup

Combination Food

Food Serving   Size
Soup 1 cup
Stew, meat and vegetables 1 cup

2 carbohydrate choices = 30 grams carbohydrate

Food Serving   Size
Lasagna or noodle casserole 1 cup
Pizza ¼    of 12 in thin curst
Potato or macaroni salad ½ cup

3 carbohydrate choices=45 grams carbohydrates

Food Serving   Size
Burrito (beef and bean) 1 (5 oz)
Dinner-type frozen meal 1 (14-17 oz)

 

Fast-Food Choices

Food Serving   Size
Chicken breast 5 oz
Chicken nuggets 6 pieces
Chicken stir-fried with vegetables 1 cup
Egg roll 1
Taco 1 small

2 carbohydrate choices= 30 grams carbohydrate

Food Serving   Size
Breakfast sandwich, biscuit or English   muffin variety 1
Hamburger, regular 1

3 carbohydrate choices = 45 grams carbohydrate

Food Serving   Size
French Fries 1 small
Sandwich grilled chicken 1
Sandwich, submarine 1 (6 in)

 

 

 

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The many benefits of healthy eating and exercise

The many benefits of healthy eating and exercise

exerciseHealthy eating and exercise have more benefits that just managing your weight. 

They are two paramount factors in preventing, or reducing the impact of certain diseases such as Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular problems, and type 2 diabetes. 

 A healthy balanced diet and exercise can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 60%.  This disease, once developed can often be maintained or controlled when the person follows a healthy eating plan and exercises. 

Exercise and a proper diet have also been shown to slow the aging process.  Physical activity is the most effective tool to improve quality of life and functional abilities in age related problems. 

Exercise and healthy eating have been shown to prevent normal memory loss as well as Alzheimer’s.  A lower caloric intake is seen to decrease a genic cause for Alzheimer’s and reduce plaques in those who have the disease. 

Obesity, high cholesterol and hypertension, which are all risk factors for cardiovascular disease,  can all be controlled with healthy eating habits and physical activity. 

Generally stated, a healthy diet consists of a variety of fruits and vegetables, lean meats such as skinless poultry and fish, and whole grain carbohydrates. Try to avoid sugar, saturated fats, and always monitor the serving size. 
 

 

http://healthdailys.com/category/health-care/

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Can depression cause heart disease?

Can depression cause heart disease?

DEPRESSION AND HEART DISEASE

The Scientific Statement was published online February 24 in Circulation.

We all know that obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes, genetics and smoking are the major risk factors for heart disease. But did you know that DEPRESSION is also linked to heart attacks? According to an American Heart Association panel, depressed patients were more likely to get heart disease than non-depressed people. It is hoped that by treating depression, we can help treat/prevent heart disease. We have known for years that all stroke patients benefit from antidepressants whether they are clinically depressed or not. There have also been numerous studies about quality of life in patients who have diabetes, heart disease, cancer or depression. As you can probably guess, the depressed patients consistently score worse than all of the other patient groups!

Even though depression is more widely accepted now than in the past, there is still a stigma associated with depression. Most insurance companies with NOT even pay the physician if a depression code is listed on the bill! And counseling! Forget about it. Insurance companies don’t mind paying hundreds of thousands of dollars for heart surgery, but to pay a few thousand for psychotherapy………..

 

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Sulfonylurea (diabetes drug class) may increase heart disease risk

Sulfonylurea (diabetes drug class) may increase heart disease risk

A study presented September  27, 2013 at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Barcelona announced that first line treatment with sulfonylureas (glipizide, glimiperide, etc.) can increase the risk of heart disease 2 fold when compared to metformin. It is interesting because these same concerns were brought up in the 1970s. What is recommended is continuing to use METFORMIN as a first line drug, but adding a “GLIPTIN” (Januvia, Onglyza or Tradjenta) to help control sugars.

This combination is great because it does not cause weight gain nor cause low sugar reactions.

So why do some patients use sulfonylureas? They are CHEAP generics and many insurance plans will not cover the newer GLIPTINS (which came on the market in 2006).

 

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